Scientists Used Loud Speakers to Simulate Healthy Coral Reefs and Attracted Fish Populations

Scientists Used Loud Speakers to Simulate Healthy Coral Reefs and Attracted Fish Populations

Increasing pollution and global warming are affecting nature as well as the life cycle of various animals. Even more, it is imposing a massive impact on marine life. As a result, coral reefs are dying, which offers habitat to multiple creatures. But a new effort of researchers from Australia and the UK has raised a new ray of hope. They have used loudspeakers to try and attract fish back to lifeless reefs. The move has probably assisted in the recovery of fishes. As per the study, published in the Journal Nature Communications, the researchers have simulated the sounds of healthy reefs. In other words, they have used a technique called acoustic enrichment.

To create the environment, they had positioned loudspeakers on areas of dead coral in the Great Barrier Reef. The scientists have discovered that double the number of fish had arrived and stayed there, as compared to the same regions with no sound. During the six-week experiment, scientists had played audio recordings of healthy reefs. It included a wide range of sounds, particularly from prospering coral communities. The sound also included noise produced by shrimp, fish, mollusks, and other reef-dwellers. As per scientists, these sounds work as signals for small fish seeking to stay and start making their own population.

The study’s leading author, Steve Simpson, said healthy coral reefs are significantly noisy places. He also noted that the crackling of shouting shrimp and the calls and growls of fish unitedly make an incredible biological soundscape. Steve added junior fish tune-up in on these sound waves while seeking for an area to settle down. The researchers have noted that loudspeakers are an alternative to restore the lost sound environment. Even more, it is a way to magnetize young fish back again. But recalling fish populations to lifeless and expiring reefs will not revoke the damage. Even more, playing sounds cannot entirely replace the previous environment. But this methodology can be used with other techniques being invented by researchers and scientists like planting new corals. Apart from this, the soundscape can be used with evolving heat-resistant coral strains, to return liveliness. In the end, the combination could assist in restoring life to areas of oceans’ reef, having increased human interference.